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The magic Banana. The new vaginal exerciser that is both yellow and “green”.

What’s new in sex toys? An environmentally sound, non-vibrating loop that tightens you up while it stimulates your G spot. Called The Magic Banana, it’s a device designed by Ontario based fine artist and yoga instructor Janeson Rayne after 30 years of research. It helps you tighten both the internal and external vaginal muscles, and prevents the need for those adult diapers in the future. The G spot can be elusive, but using basic muscle principles, tightening up those hard-to-reach muscles can ensure a more powerful orgasm.

The magic banana is defined as a self-discovery champion, designed by a woman for women

The Magic Banana® responds directly and immediately to your muscles, and works in harmony with your own movement. The flexible loop contracts and releases in conjunction with your inner muscles (‘the magical muscles’). You can insert and hold The Magic Banana® inside and squeeze against it pulsing on and off with your muscles or move it back and forth to experience completely unique rippling sensations, discovering areas you may not have even known existed! The loop of The Magic Banana® with its signature subtle curve is designed to reach and stimulate the G-spot.

How to use the Magic Banana

1. For first-timers, definitely lubricate the Magic Banana. It might also be a good idea to lubricate the vaginal area. Be sure to relax and allow yourself the necessary privacy.

2. Insert the Magic Banana, with the curve of the loop facing up. You will have to squeeze it so that it will fit; the initial size of the Magic Banana will seem daunting and large otherwise. With practice, it will get easier.

3. Once inserted, the Magic Banana will expand and press against the vaginal walls, which at first, might feel a bit awkward.

4. If you’re looking to improve the strength of your vaginal muscles, contract and relax the muscles against the resistance created by the Magic Banana.

5. If you’re looking to explore your G-spot, move the Magic Banana in and out. The loop will massage the soft tissue that makes up the G-spot.

—Source: magicbanana.com and Janeson Rayne

This banana is no ordinary fruit.

The Magic Banana, created by Kingston artist and yoga instructor, Janeson Rayne, BFA ’97, has
steadily gained in popularity among women since it first hit the market in 2000.

The Magic Banana is available online, at select specialty shops in North America and at the Sexual
Health Resource Centre (SHRC) at Queen’s, which is located in room 223 in clubs space in the JDUC.

G Boutique, a female-friendly shop in Chicago, has recently sold its 700th Magic Banana, according to Rayne. The store has carried her product for three years. The SHRC declined to comment on how many Magic Bananas have been sold. The device is sold under two different names—although still the same product—reflecting its two different uses. The Magic Banana is advertised as a female exploration tool, whereas its sister, the KLoop, is advertised as an aid in curing incontinence, which occurs when the vaginal muscles lose their elasticity.

Rayne said because the use of her product is not immediately apparent, it has added appeal.

“It is non-phallic and it is discrete,” Rayne said.

It’s called the Magic Banana because the curve of the loop is such that it creates the silhouette of that curvaceous fruit. Although at first glance it seems rather large, the flexibility of the Magic Banana allows for it to be bent and contorted for insertion into the vagina.

“You can move it manually in and out, which stimulates the G-spot,” Rayne said. “You can use it in conjunction with a vibrator or any kind of clitoral stimulation. … The loop actually reaches the walls of the vagina and stimulates them in a way that even a penis or other apparatus can’t.” If you visit the product’s website, magicbanana.com, there are nearly 30 testimonials from women who have used the product.

“It’s like a Thigh Master for your vagina!” wrote Hannah Varto, a Public Health Nurse from B.C. The K-Loop is advertised in a more medically-oriented context. It’s used in conjunction with Kegel exercises, named after the gynecologist who invented them. The exercises are a series of vaginal exercises used to help with incontinence.